Grzimek's Student Animal Life Resource: Corals, Jellyfish, Sponges and Other Simple Animals

Grzimek's Student Animal Life Resource: Corals, Jellyfish, Sponges and Other Simple Animals

Catherine Allen

Language: English

Pages: 346

ISBN: 2:00246240

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Grzimek's Student Animal Life Resource: Corals, Jellyfish, Sponges and Other Simple Animals offers readers comprehensive and easy-to-use information on Earth's animals. Entries are arranged by taxonomy, the science through which living things are classified into related groups. Each entry includes sections on physical characteristics; geographic range; habitat; diet; behavior and reproduction; animals and people; and conservation status. Family entries are followed by one or more species accounts and a range map and photo or illustration for each species. Entries conclude with a list of books, periodicals, and Web sites that may be used for further research.

This volume of Grzimek's Student Animal Life Resource: Corals, Jellyfish, Sponges and Other Simple Animals includes a pronunciation guide for scientific names, a glossary, an overview of birds, a list of species in the set by biome, a list of species by geographic location, and an index. The volume has nearly 200 full-color maps, photos, and illustrations to enliven the text, and sidebars provide additional facts and related information.

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Corals.” National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. http://www.nos.noaa.gov/education/kits/corals/welcome.html (accessed on January 25, 2005). Anemones and Corals 41 HYDROIDS Hydrozoa Class: Hydrozoa Number of families: 114 families class phylum class subclass order monotypic order suborder family PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS Hydroids (HIGH-droyds) have two body forms. One is the medusa (mi-DOO-suh), a jelly-like, umbrella-shaped, freely swimming form with a mouth and tentacles that face

tapeworms are fish-eating mammals such as dogs, cats, bears, seals, and humans. The first intermediate hosts are crustaceans (krus-TAY-shuns), which are water-dwelling animals that have jointed legs and a hard shell but no backbone. The second intermediate hosts are fishes. All the hosts live in or near rivers and freshwater lakes. Diet: Broad fish tapeworms absorb nutrients from their hosts. Behavior and reproduction: Scientists do not know how broad fish tapeworms behave. These worms make

Animal Life Resource Seison nebaliae rotifers live on sea fleas. (Illustration by Joseph E. Trumpey. Reproduced by permission.) Behavior and reproduction: Except that S. nebaliae rotifers live on sea fleas, scientists do not know how they behave. These rotifers use sexual reproduction. Seison nebaliae and people: S. nebaliae rotifers have no known importance to people. Conservation status: S. nebaliae rotifers are not considered threatened or endangered. ■ FOR MORE INFORMATION Books: Smith,

threatened or endangered. Thorny-Headed Worms 149 Moniliformis moniliformis SPECIES ACCOUNTS NO COMMON NAME Moniliformis moniliformis Physical characteristics: Moniliformis moniliformis worms are long, threadlike, and often coiled. Females are 4 to 11 inches (10 to 27 centimeters) long. Males are 1.6 to 2 inches (4 to 5 centimeters) long. The snouts of these worms have 12 lengthwise rows of seven to eight hooks. Geographic range: Moniliformis moniliformis (abbreviated as M. moniliformis)

Giant thorny-headed worms live all over the Habitat: Adult giant thorny-headed worms live in hogs, squirrels, moles, hyenas, and dogs. The larvae live in cockroaches and beetles. Diet: Giant thorny-headed worms absorb nutrients from their hosts. Behavior and reproduction: Female giant thorny-headed worms release a huge number of eggs that can survive more than three years in the primary host. The larvae develop for four to five months in the 152 Grzimek’s Student Animal Life Resource Adult

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