The Man Without Content (Meridian: Crossing Aesthetics)

The Man Without Content (Meridian: Crossing Aesthetics)

Giorgio Agamben

Language: English

Pages: 144

ISBN: 0804735549

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


In this book, one of Italy's most important and original contemporary philosophers considers the status of art in the modern era. He takes seriously Hegel's claim that art has exhausted its spiritual vocation, that it is no longer through art that Spirit principally comes to knowledge of itself. He argues, however, that Hegel by no means proclaimed the "death of art" (as many still imagine) but proclaimed rather the indefinite continuation of art in what Hegel called a "self-annulling" mode.

With astonishing breadth and originality, the author probes the meaning, aesthetics, and historical consequences of that self-annulment. In essence, he argues that the birth of modern aesthetics is the result of a series of schisms—between artist and spectator, genius and taste, and form and matter, for example—that are manifestations of the deeper, self-negating yet self-perpetuating movement of irony.

Through this concept of self-annulment, the author offers an imaginative reinterpretation of the history of aesthetic theory from Kant to Heidegger, and he opens up original perspectives on such phenomena as the rise of the modern museum, the link between art and terror, the natural affinity between "good taste" and its perversion, and kitsch as the inevitable destiny of art in the modern era. The final chapter offers a dazzling interpretation of Dürer's Melancholia in the terms that the book has articulated as its own.

The Man Without Content will naturally interest those who already prize Agamben's work, but it will also make his name relevant to a whole new audience—those involved with art, art history, the history of aesthetics, and popular culture.

Edmund Burke's Aesthetic Ideology: Language, Gender and Political Economy in Revolution (Cambridge Studies in Romanticism, Volume 4)

The Picture in Question: Mark Tansey and the Ends of Representation

A Companion to Ancient Aesthetics (Blackwell Companions to the Ancient World)

The Ideology of the Aesthetic

Edmund Burke's Aesthetic Ideology: Language, Gender and Political Economy in Revolution (Cambridge Studies in Romanticism, Volume 4)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

each is the power of a separate independent personality. The being-for-self [of this consciousness, A.V.M.] has its own being-for-self for object as an out-and-out "other," and yet, at the same time, directly as its own self-itself as an "other"; not as if this had a different content, for the content is the same self in the form of an absolute antithesis and a completely indifferent existence of its own. Here, then, we have the Spirit of this real world of culture, Spirit that is conscious of

after leading the "Venetian Ship" across "the high seas of Painting," Boschini concludes his adventurous itinerary with the meticulous description of an imaginary gallery. Boschini lingers for a long time on the shape that, according to the taste of the time, the walls and the corners of the ceilings must have: Lopera su i sofiti, the xe piani e' i fenze in archi, e in volti li trasforma. Cusi de piani ai concavi el da forma e tesse a i ochi industriosi ingani. El fa the i cantonali in forma

after leading the "Venetian Ship" across "the high seas of Painting," Boschini concludes his adventurous itinerary with the meticulous description of an imaginary gallery. Boschini lingers for a long time on the shape that, according to the taste of the time, the walls and the corners of the ceilings must have: Lopera su i sofiti, the xe piani e' i fenze in archi, e in volti li trasforma. Cusi de piani ai concavi el da forma e tesse a i ochi industriosi ingani. El fa the i cantonali in forma

infinite numerical succession. This is the dimension of time that is familiar to us and that our chronometers measure with ever greater precision-whether they employ for this purpose the movement of cogwheels, as in common watches, or of weight and the radiation of matter, as in atomic chronometers. Yet rhythm-as we commonly understand it-appears to introduce into this eternal flow a split and a stop. Thus in a musical piece, although it is somehow in time, we perceive rhythm as something that

Montinari, vol. 5.2 (New York: de Gruyter, 1973), P. 403. 30. Nietzsche, Will to Power, p. 453 n. 853, and p. 435 n. 822. 31. Ibid., pp. 51-52 n. 83. 32. Ibid., p. 225 n. 419. The reading of Marx contained in this chapter would not have been possible without Heidegger's seminal studies on Nietzsche's thought, in particular "The Word of Nietzsche: `God is dead"' (1950) and Nietzsche (1961). y. The Original Structure of the Work ofArt ,. Holderlin, quoted in Bettina von Arnim, Die Gunderode,

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